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It's Your World
Cover of It's Your World
It's Your World
Get Informed, Get Inspired & Get Going!
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Get Informed! Get Inspired! Get Going! The New York Times bestselling book of empowerment for kids. Make a difference in your world!In a book that tackles the biggest challenges facing us today,...
Get Informed! Get Inspired! Get Going! The New York Times bestselling book of empowerment for kids. Make a difference in your world!In a book that tackles the biggest challenges facing us today,...
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  • Get Informed! Get Inspired! Get Going! The New York Times bestselling book of empowerment for kids. Make a difference in your world!
    In a book that tackles the biggest challenges facing us today, Chelsea Clinton combines facts, charts, photographs and stories to give readers a deep understanding of the world around them—and how anyone can make a difference. With stories about children and teens who have made real changes big and small—in their families, their communities, in our country and across the world—this book will inspire readers of all ages to do their part to make our world a better place.
    In addition to informing and inspiring readers about topics including Poverty, Homelessness, Food Insecurity, Access to Education, Gender Equality, Epidemics, Non-Communicable Diseases, Climate Change, and Endangered Species, this book encourages everyone to get going! With suggestions and ideas for action, Chelsea Clinton shows readers that the world belongs to every single one of us, and every one of us counts.
    You can make a difference. You can make a change. It's your world.
    Praise for It's Your World:
    "Clinton clearly paid attention to her parents' discussions at the dinner table, and she capably shares the lessons they imparted about the future impact of what we do in the present."—Publishers Weekly
    "[A] terrific resource for junior activists."—Booklist

    "This book is a resource for children and teens who also want to make a difference and may not know where to begin or may have an idea for ways they can make a difference."—VOYA
    From the Hardcover edition.

Excerpts-

  • From the book

    Courtesy of the UN, Map No. 4170

    INTRODUCTION

    What’s the first thing you remember reading? The first thing I remember reading on my own was the local newspaper, the old-fashioned kind that left ink stains on my hands. I probably read Corduroy or a Curious George story first, out loud to my parents, but it’s the newspapers I pored over as I ate my morning Cheerios that mark the line in my mind between not-reading and reading. The newspaper is probably what I remember most because it’s what enabled me to be a part of my parents’ conversations about what was happening in our hometown of Little Rock, Arkansas, and the broader world. Those conversations happened around the dinner table every night and intensely after church on Sunday over lunch. They happened on the way to school and on the way home from ballet class, before Brownies meetings and after softball games. In other words, they happened all the time.

    Knowing what was in the newspaper meant I didn’t have to wait for my parents to explain everything to me. I could ask questions to start conversations about the world too. Best of all? The newspaper helped hide how much honey I poured on top of my Cheerios. My mom wouldn’t let me have sugary cereal growing up (more on that later) and so I improvised, adding far more honey than likely would have been in any honeyed cereals. Thankfully, my mom never caught on.

    I was very fortunate growing up. My main worries were things like trying to get my mom to relax her ban on sugary cereals, figuring out how to stick a clay honeycomb or papier-mâché Jupiter or clay-and-Popsicle-stick coral reef to poster board for various science projects, how to sell more Girl Scout Cookies than I did the year before and whether my best friend Elizabeth and I would sleep at her house or my house Saturday night. I never doubted I would have a roof over my head, a school to go to, enough to eat, books (and newspapers) to read, a safe neighborhood to play in and a doctor to see if I got sick.

    My parents and grandparents made sure I knew I was lucky. I don’t remember a time not knowing the life story of my mom’s mom, my grandma Dorothy. By the time she was eight, my grandma Dorothy’s parents had abandoned her twice, often leaving her hungry and alone in their Chicago apartment. The first time was when she was three years old. Ultimately, they sent her to live with her grandparents in California. When she became a teenager, her grandparents told her she was no longer welcome in their home and that since she was old enough to get a job and support herself, she had to leave. If she hadn’t found a job working in someone else’s home, she would have been homeless. If her employers hadn’t supported her determination to go to school, she would have had to drop out. As a teenager, she constantly worried about whether she would have a roof over her head, be able to go to school or have enough to eat.

    Courtesy of the Author’s Parents

    My grandma Dorothy as a kid in 1928.

    My grandmother always talked very matter-of-factly about her memories of being hungry and scared as a child. Knowing her story helped me be aware that some of the kids I knew at Forest Park Elementary, Booker Arts Magnet School or Horace Mann Junior High likely had to worry about whether there would be enough to eat that day and whether it would be safe to play outside when they got home. Less than twenty-five years before I was born, Horace Mann was a school only for African American students. Back then, schools were segregated by race in Arkansas—as they were across much...

Reviews-

  • Publisher's Weekly

    September 7, 2015
    This earnest compendium by the former (and perhaps future) presidential First Daughter outlines ways that teens and tweens can harness their power for good. Clinton begins each of the book's four sections (It's Your Economy, It's Your Right, It's Your Body, It's Your Environment) with an overview of problems—homelessness, gender discrimination, disease, pollution—and clearly explains how perniciously interconnected so many of them are: poverty results in hunger, which affects school performance, which undermines employability. She highlights young people who have already done extraordinary things to improve their communities, then enumerates several opportunities available to readers: fundraising to build wells, patronizing restaurants that participate in food giveaways, donating hair to make wigs for kids with cancer. She also shares some tidbits of personal history—her aversion to corporal punishment stems from being paddled in elementary school after a classmate tricked her into saying a bad word to a beloved teacher. Clinton clearly paid attention to her parents' discussions at the dinner table, and she capably shares the lessons they imparted about the future impact of what we do in the present. Ages 10–up.

  • Kirkus

    September 1, 2015
    From an activist who sent a protest letter to President Ronald Reagan when she was 5, a tally of urgent worldwide concerns and issues, with pointed calls to get the lead out. Clinton traces her lifelong involvement in social and environmental causes to family and to the classic 50 Simple Things You Can Do to Save the Earth (1989). She intersperses carefully researched factual surveys and admiring profiles of other (mostly) young activists with her own experiences and opinions. Though these personal notes are fairly engaging, overall the nine topical chapters make dry reading: "Poverty and stunting are deeply intertwined. Parents living in extreme poverty are more likely to have children who suffer from stunting. Children who are stunted generally grow up less physically and mentally strong...," etc. She also sidesteps complexity by, for instance, not mentioning complaints about Heifer International's deceptive donation model or ever, despite discussion of human trafficking, using the words "rape" or (except in the section on HIV/AIDS) "sex." Nor does she make it easy for young people patient enough to stay the course to strike out on their own. Though the many contact URLs that are buried in the narrative are at least repeated at the ends of their respective chapters, they come in bulleted lists of suggestions that tend toward either repetitive boilerplate ("Talk to your family and at least three friends...") or generalities like "Stay away from secondhand smoke." Still, everything here is, or had better be, of compelling concern to young people, and her concluding "It's better to get caught trying" is inarguable if not exactly electric. Another voice in the chorus of calls to action-earnest and on target but more likely to be bought than read. (map, charts, infographics, index) (Nonfiction. 10-13)

    COPYRIGHT(2015) Kirkus Reviews, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

  • School Library Journal

    October 1, 2015

    Gr 5-8-This basic primer on social issues covers education; poverty, both in the United States and globally; women's rights; public health; and the environment. Taking an upbeat, positive approach, former First Daughter Clinton stresses the importance of being proactive and involved when it comes to current events. She includes many examples of children and teens who have made a difference, and each chapter ends with a list of concrete actions readers can take to "Get Going!" Relevant topics (the antivaccination movement, global warming, the wage gap) are broken down in accessible, if slightly dry, language; while comprehensible, the book occasionally veers into PSA territory. Though Clinton draws upon her own personal experiences in an attempt to make the text more relatable (her tone is that of a gentle and encouraging older sister), references to her more privileged background often feel slightly tone-deaf (for instance, in a section discussing how medical problems such as heart disease disproportionately affect people of color from low socioeconomic backgrounds, the author mentions the lifestyle changes that her father, former president Bill Clinton, made after undergoing bypass surgery). While the cheery yellow cover and chapter headings presented in bubble lettering suggest a younger audience, this is a fairly dense tome (the text is broken up by the occasional chart or serviceable black-and-white photograph) that may prove daunting for those seeking pleasure reading. However, the information is sound, useful, and timely, and each of the chapters would make for good stand-alone options for lesson plans or reports. VERDICT A solid addition to global studies or current events units or projects.-Mahnaz Dar, School Library Journal

    Copyright 2015 School Library Journal, LLC Used with permission.

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